The Summer I Planted Milkweed


milkweedbombs

Milkweed “bombs” on my bike during RAGBRAI–each contains about 3 seeds of various Milkweed varieties in clay for bikers to toss in Iowa ditches. Yes, I thought of saving a few, but they were meant to be distributed along our RAGBRAI route, so that is what I did.

Well, that title is a little deceiving—I’ve planted milkweed for several summers in a row, but with no success.

First, I saved some seeds from wild plants at a daughter’s house, and sewed those in the spring. Then, I read more about milkweed, and realized the seed have to overwinter in order to germinate, so last fall, I planted the seeds I gathered right away to let them experience the Iowa winter as they ought to experience it.

But, no—I have seen some evidence that a seed I spread maybe sprouted in the woods behind my house, although, to be fair, one may have just blown there, too. In my gardens, there are lots of weeds that take root, but none of them tasty to Monarch butterflies.

This year, a professor at Mount Mercy gave me a plant from her garden, which I put in my garden and watered for weeks. After a month or so, it had not grown but also not faded, and I was starting to think “success,” when one morning, it was dead.

Milkweed is like that, gardeners.

Noelridge Park greenhouses have a Mother’s Day open house, and they gave out free Milkweed plants. I got one, as did numerous grandchildren, and I planted those. They are doing fine, but are also only annual plants—the greenhouse did not give out perennial Milkweed.

I transplanted some Milkweed from my daughter’s yard—four plants. Two did the “I will hold on for weeks and suddenly die” trick, but two have actually not just stayed alive, but have also grown. I don’t want to jinx it, but of the five native Milkweed plants I put in the ground this year, it’s possible two might survive.

And I bought “butterfly flower” plants, a type of Milkweed, both at HyVee Drug Store and a local flower shop. I went a little overboard, I suppose. There are at least four plants in back and four more in front—so eight store-purchased plants. None of those have died, but some have not yet grown and may yet be in the “failure to thrive” category.

But about half have grown—one has even bloomed.

milkweed1

Perennial Milkweed in front of house, above, in bloom. Annual Milkweed (below) getting ready to bloom.

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I won’t know the results until spring, when I see what comes back, but I do finally seem to have Milkweed in my garden. Even with all of the other plants I purchased and put in and failed to hear from—where are you, other colors of Coneflower or any Toad Lilies at all?—that would make 2016 a good year in my gardens.

In past years, I have seen Monarchs in my garden enjoying the Coneflowers. None so far this year—but if the Monarchs ever return, I am hoping they also have plants to lay eggs on.

Now, if I can just persuade the Mount Mercy University Bike Club and the powers-that-be on the facilities staff—maybe I can get a Milkweed-butterfly garden going at MMU …

bee

Bee on a Coneflower in my garden a few days ago. Sadly, I have not seen any Monarch butterflies visiting them this summer, but this kind of flower is one that they like. They can’t lay their eggs on it, though–for baby Monarch butterflies, you need Milkweed.

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