What Comes Up in a Wet Year


Iris in my back garden. The other one in the video is in the side garden. Both are transplants from Cate's yard.

Iris in my back garden. The other one in the video is in the side garden. Both are transplants from Cate’s yard.

Is 2013 another 1993? Let’s hope not.

That year, I recall thinking that it was easy to know whether you needed to mow your lawn. You’d look out your window. If it was raining, you didn’t mow. If it wasn’t raining, regardless of how wet the ground was, it was time to mow NOW. My sister in Des Moines suffered more than I did that year, as their water supply was flooded out. I recall lots of detours and closed roads, but I also planted a bunch of trees that year.

It feels very odd to have saturated ground and the danger of flooding looming. Just weeks ago, we were still wrapped up in a year-long drought. Well, we’re not in a drought right now. Anybody know how to build an arc?

It’s not easy to get enough RAGBRAI practice in during a wet year. But still, there is some advantage for too much wet. Nothing grows in a drought. There are problems—bugs, fungus, flooding—with too much wet, but at least much of the world is green right now.

Anyway, I created this slide show of what is blooming now. I may miss a few flowers during our upcoming trip, but in this wet, wet year, at least the flowers are doing well. The only irises that are blooming, by the way, are ones that Cate let me have. Apparently, I must have her grow irises and get them from her into order to have them bloom …

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