A Warm Day For the Gardening To Begin


Crocus in front yard.

Crocus in front yard.

Crocus in back yard.

Crocus in back yard.

Crocus in back garden.

Crocus in back garden.

Not blooming yet, but soon. Back yard crocus.

Not blooming yet, but soon. Back yard crocus.

Crocus at base of tulip tree in back.

Crocus at base of tulip tree in back.

Snow drops in back garden.

Snow drops in back garden.

Snow drops.

Snow drops.

Fern in back. North side of fence still has ice.

Fern in back. North side of fence still has ice.

Ground cover, showing early flower buds.

Ground cover, showing early flower buds.

Grass is brown but moss in back  yard has turned green.

Grass is brown but moss in back yard has turned green.

Clump of daffodils knifing above the cool garden soil.

Clump of daffodils knifing above the cool garden soil.

Trumpet vine seeds before planting.

Trumpet vine seeds before planting.

Cone flower seeds.

Cone flower seeds.

Snow drop.

Snow drop.

Winter was yard on bird bath.

Winter was yard on bird bath.

I’m a bit behind—what else it new—and need to clean the leaves off of some gardens now that April is almost here. But I did get started with just a bit of planting on this fine warm Good Friday.

I had saved some seeds from a trumpet vine that is invading Katy’s yard. I planted these behind my fence. Yes, I know, this can be an aggressive kind of flower, and a bit of a pest to control—but it’s not an invasive foreign species, it’s an invasive native Iowa wildflower, so there.

Anyway, the world is safe if I have no better luck with this than all of the other wildflowers I’ve planted in the woods behind the fence.

Besides some borrowed trumpet vine seed, I also collected some coneflower seeds from my garden. Since the utility company cut out so much wood, I figure there is more light and maybe some of these will grow.

They would look prettier than the garlic mustard that dominates back there, at least.

Besides that I contented myself with shooting a few more flower pictures. Some yellow crocuses in the yard have joined the blue ones in the back garden in blooming, and many more are just starting to show and bud. The dominant color scheme in the outdoors is still brown, but if you look, you can see little splotches of color—green and some early flowers—that show that Iowa is on the verge of suddenly and spectacularly turning green.

May we get some April rain to maintain that hue.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s