Noontime in the Garden of Light and Dark


New bird bath, gift from Audrey, installed and filled. I like how the bush over the bath reflects in the water.

I was being lazy today—not a surprise, enjoying my final day of being 51 years old. After church, as Audrey worked on a lavish birthday meal for me because Katy and Theresa and assorted members of their families (kids in Katy’s case, spouse in Theresa’s) were coming over for a 1 p.m. birthday dinner, I lazed in a hammock in the back yard.

First, I skimmed a few news stories, a few opinion columns, and read the comics.

Then, after swatting one of the many mosquitoes to whom I unwillingly served as an egg maturing protein source, I looked up and thought about light.

Me, in hammock, contemplating light. Shady back yard with sun shining between leaves is a good place to ponder photons.

One of the frustrations of having any pretense of being a photographer is that the human eye is so much more sensitive than most cameras are to color and light. We look up through the canopy of an enlarging tulip tree, and have no problem seeing greens in the shade, in the light and the blueness of the sky. Yet, to a camera, the scene is much more harshly light or dark.

A camera is to our eyes what Sarah Palin is to a functioning brain. One sees the world in stark lights and darks, the other deals much more deftly with subtly.

Anyway, despite even a modern digital camera’s limits compared to the potent potential of rather advanced optic sensory organs and a huge brain to process the data, I think much of photography, particularly interesting photography of details, dwells in the contrast between light and dark.

I present numerous exhibits, with some commentary. With the exception of the candle photo, which I think Audrey took (not 100 percent sure, Theresa used the camera a lot, too), these are all pre pre-birthday dinner, taken in the back yard, some without leaving the hammock.

Looking up through the tulip tree at light and dark leaves.

Now, I don’t claim that these are great photos, or fantastically artistic. But I will say, from having dealt with students using cameras, that seeing the light, the way it plays across a scene, where light and dark contrast and the direction from which light is coming, are keys to taking pictures.

Light, dark, sky, shade--leaves shining as they diffuse the sun, a leaf in shade. All of which was more vivid and ever quickly changing when viewed by eye.

I hope you enjoy some of these images. I enjoyed taking them and thinking about them. Now, after posting this (it will take a while with all these jpg files), back to work.

Some additional day before birthday photos on Facebook.

This one is a magnolia leaf. I lIke the leaves that are blurry in the background, suggesting the kind of canopy there is in the back yard.

Magnolia, part one. Sharp lines between light and dark.

Same leaf, different angle, zoomed out a bit more for context.

Hammock fabric shimmers in light like armor, deeper color in shade.

OK, I got up and moved. This is the hammock swing on the maple tree, not the hammock. Light on white rope, darkness in background (which is just part of the yard and fence, would not look so dark to human eye).

New birdbath in place again. Like the way the ceramic surface gives a distorted suggestion of a reflection.

Yeah, almost the same view, closer to patches of light and dark.

Bush is a volunteer in the side garden so I don't know what it is. But it's in the light ...

I think this one is the weeping cherry tree. Colorful spots in background are toys in the sandbox. OK, camera may not react as quickly as eye, but frozen instant with depth of field is something it does well.

Native violet leaf in garden near bird bath. With, yes, dark background.

Not quite as arty as a Kathryn Hagy water photo--but me filling birdbath with one hand, and photographing with the other. Lucky right hand can handle hose, because it leaves my good left hand for more complex work (I am a southpaw).

The birthday picture I did not take, Audrey did, I think. Nikayla and I with my brithday brownies.

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One response to “Noontime in the Garden of Light and Dark

  1. Pingback: 2010 in review | Crgardenjoe's Blog

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